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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #31 
Here is the foredeck, shown during the sanding and polishing phase in preparation for the mold.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #32 
I only get a chance to photograph once a week or so.  At that rate, I miss a lot of the intermediate steps in the work being done.  This photo shows the completed mold, but I can assure you there was a great deal more to making even a mold of this size than comes across in the four photo series going up today. 

Here, two braces are seen being glassed on to strengthen the mold.  Interestingly, these will be mirrored on the completed deck.  In that case, however, they will be beneath it rather than on the top of it.

The last photo shows the original deck, after the mold had been removed.  As you can see, it had to be very smooth and well polished to get a clean mold.  The stuff hanging on it is mold release agent.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #33 
Here you can see the completed deck and transom molds on a shelf.  You can still see the seam on the transom mold section where the height was increased from 16 to 20 inches.  This is of no concern since the deck mold covers the entire transom area of the hull.  In fact this will serve as a ready made cut line for the replacement hull on the original boat which will still be 16 inches at the motor clamp.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #34 
Here Kevin McCracken uses an air tool to block sand the left hull mold section.  At this stage 36 grit is being used as this particular section is being done for the first time and there is a lot to get through.  As the work progresses he will change to 80 grit and then do the final stages by hand. 

The sandpaper being used is called "Hookit" and uses velcro to affix the paper to the sander.  The paper must be changed frequently since it dulls quickly and dull loaded paper will heat the surface being sanded.  If much heating occurs the mold will change it's shape and all the effort of trying to make it smooth from that point on will be for naught.

The blue tape line at the bottom marks off an area where the hull has a slight change in angle.  This was caused by a pair of boards placed into the bottom of the hull after its maiden voyage to correct handling and structural problems.

The upper tape line indicates an area where the deck overlaps the hull again.  This area will not need so much effort to be expended as it will never be seen once assembled.  It just has to have a good polish for mold release but waviness is unimportant here.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #35 
The two mold halves are being worked on together.  Both pieces are very accessible on the temporary work table.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #36 
As seen from the rear, the section on the left (actually the right half of the hull mold) has been completely re-blocked. 

"Duraglass" was then used to fill low spots and it was blocked again.  This was the section previously shown with all the waviness.  It was that waviness which prompted calling in the block sanding expert. 

Here it can be seen after being sprayed with fresh Gel Coat.  The other side (detailed two posts above) is being worked on while this side cures.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #37 
Another view of the recently re-gel coated starboard hull mold section.  It will be block sanded at least once more to eliminate the inescapable orange peel and then polished to a show car smooth finish.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #38 
While the work on the hull continues, the other mold work continues to progress as well.  At this point, work on the most important part of the boat has begun!  Not the motor, not the deck, not seats, but the FINS!!!

The Larks signature feature.

It is interesting to consider for a moment, just what came first here, the Chicken or the egg.  I don't think anyone can look at this boat and not see a '59 Cadillac represented, but this boat was designed prior to it's own debut in 1956, long before the cars unveiling. 

It's a fact that at this time in automotive history, there was a three year lead time between design and production of cars.  Furthermore, no one worked in a vacuum.  every designer watched carefully what everyone else was doing and they all took inspiration from one another to some degree.

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #39 
In the photo above you can see that some of the apparent height of the fins comes from the downward angle at the bottom of the fin.  Naturally this is interrupted here by a bumper, but if you'll notice, the bottom of the bumper represents an extension of the fin jutting downward beneath it. 

I have never heard this possible connection described in any current automotive literature, but today, this is a lesser known boat than the car, aside from the Classic boating community and fans of Brooks Stevens.

In it's day, however, the design was very well known and was even featured on the covers of Newsweek and Popular boating. Furthermore, nearly every newspapers coverage of the 1956 National Boat Show , which traveled from NY to Chicago, to L.A. featured photo's of the Evinrude Lark.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #40 
It was decided that a good way to make the mold would be to extend the inside edge of one fin to mirror the outside edge.  In this way, only one mold is needed.  The resultant fin can be cut down to make either a left or a right. 

The first step in the molds creation saw the fins extension using cardboard and Bondo.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #41 
As shown in this photo, there is a cardboard divider splitting the fin into two sections.  Once the first half of the mold is done, the cardboard will be removed and the first mold half will become the division for the second mold half.

The triangles are made from aluminum tape and will create areas in the mold which will serve to lock the sections together without the possibility of misalignment.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #42 
The area at the rear edge, or transition < in the fin has a fake exhaust port in the Cadillac Sea Lark design.  The Evinrude Lark version of the design used this area for a retractible ski tow in each fin.  The 59 Cadillac automobile fin places the light pod in this area.

As you can see, the original part is imperfect.  The Outer diameter of the fake exhaust port is not perfectly round, but is misshapen and somewhat oval.  The center uses an aluminum tube with a red plug so that part at least is perfectly round. 

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #43 
We looked around and found something that had the exact same diameter as the outer exhaust port.  The original was temporarily removed and the perfectly round item was substituted for the mold work.  Our solution?  The lid off a can of spray paint!  It is yellow in these photo's. 

We altered the center of the lid to match the concave design using modeling clay. 

Once the mold is done the original part will be re-attached for the restoration of the original boat.

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #44 
Here, in photo one, the first half of the mold is shown finished! 

The second half has been started as seen in photo two.  The cardboard divider is gone.  The mold release, gel coat and random mat have been applied already and a layer of cloth has been cut and laid on awaiting the resin.  It's moving fast!

-KevFin

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KevFin

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Reply with quote  #45 
Now both sides of the mold are done and the "plug" or original fin, has been removed.  The third photo shows the opened mold which aligns using the triangular locks shown under construction at the start of this segment.

-KevFin

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