KevFin
A red one this time!  I will be posting some pictures later today.  I have 80 or so shots awaiting cropping, sizing and captioning.  I also need to get back to the other thread as I have many updates for that one too...

-KevFin
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KevFin
Well, here I am a day late and a dollar short!  I meant to start posting yesterday. 

I was fortunate to obtain an excellent motor for the new boat so I will start there.  This is a 1958 Evinrude "fat fifty" a V-4 built the same year as the original Sea Lark we are copying. 

This engine was sold to me by Brad Best through eBay as an NOS engine, and I believed it as soon as I saw the condition.  It was said to have come from an old timer in the AOMCI.org a group dedicated to the preservation and restoration of antique outboards.  He had stated to Brad that he had purchased it from an estate himself.  The original owner was said to have intended it for use on a wooden boat kit that was never completed.  The motor sold after his passing.




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KevFin
Something about these motors is that they all included a fluorescent red pressure sensitive decal on the top rear as they left the factory.  Something you never, ever see is one that has not faded to white from the sun!


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KevFin
Another tell-tale is the shift lever attachment.  It still has paint on it in the area of the metal cable twist connector.


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KevFin
Here's another surprise, the fragile water transfer shift decal and a nice looking propeller, absent the usual paint wear.

 

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KevFin
Speaking of decals, this one is located on the carburetor access door inside the cover adjacent to damaging heat, oil and fuel vapors.

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KevFin
Looking up from beneath the rear of the engine.  The tilt handles were an option which was always dealer installed so there is a slight mismatch to the color.  Despite the overall condition of the paint on this outboard, the motor will be done in switchblade silver so as to perfectly match the fins and trim on the new boat. 

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KevFin
Tilting the camera downward we can see the original style of lower unit.  It was a tough call, but we have decided to swap it out for a few years newer design.  This simple change will gain us ten HP, boosting output to an even sixty and decreasing drag in the water due to a much thinner cross section.

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KevFin
The serial number plate and another remarkably unfaded graphic.  Believe me, they mean what they say!  Failure to heed this kindly advice may yield a broken wrist, leg, arm or what-have-you!  The spring in there might well serve the suspension on a mini-van.

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KevFin
Actually, new or used, any of these motors is likely to be in good condition mechanically, they were never used as much as cars.  As most collectors know the really important part is the plastic!  These complex emblems are not being reproduced and it is unlikely that they ever will.  The pieces on this example are simply stunning!  The bottom piece, especially, is extremely susceptible to damage from poor storage and it wraps completely around the motor in a horizontal C-shape!  Beautiful!

Arrow points to the steering cable pulley bracket, again, no chipped paint!  An amazing find.  I hope to be back at it again tomorrow with photo's of the trailer work.


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KevFin
In the past I have had trouble getting trailers done in time to be ready when the boat is.  There is always a lot of logistics in building something like this so I decided to start the trailer even before the resin and fiberglass was in!

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KevFin
It was decided to use a Tee Nee again.  These are just perfect styling to accentuate the curvature of the fin area on a Sea Lark.  I like to mix and match trailer pieces.  This center (suspension) section was real nice but the keel tube was terrible.  In fact, it had been cut off to repair another trailer.  That is a nice keel section laying on the floor beside it.

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KevFin
Another issue it had was that the rear cross-member had been long lost and a piece of C-channel welded on.  This would not do at all, but the center section included the better kind of bunk adjustments.  Some trailers just had a series of holes to put a bolt through, but these are completely variable by tightening a single nut.  Tee Nee always did a lot to update and improve their trailers as the years passed.

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KevFin
Deconstructing one of these is always difficult.  The bolts include a lot of square heads and these are found on the nuts as well.  Good luck getting one off with a ratchet after fifty years.  That is if a ratchet would fit a square nut of course.  I replace all these rotten things with hex nuts and bolts!

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KevFin
Many of these trailers have nylon rollers within the keel tube.  That worked fine when new but there really isn't any practical way to repair them (they rust solid and won't turn).  Even if you could, a trailer with carpet in this area has more friction when out of water.  That means in traffic the boat is less likely to shift position when carpet is employed. 

I use only the best tools and equipment that two dollars will buy and I shop only the finest rummage sales!

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